Cameron Is Piling Up The U-Turns

Blimey even Benedict Brogan, supporter of the coalition and part of the Westminster narrative, has noticed that Cameron may…cough…not be all he seems:

Those who have long believed that David Cameron is a PR man whose politics are driven by managerialist opportunism, not principle, will be unsurprised by the latest u-turn announced yesterday.

What’s more interesting though is the pattern of these tactical compromises that is becoming the leitmotif of Mr Cameron’s administration. The issues on which he has trimmed are piling up: school sports, free milk, the Lisbon treaty, repatriation of EU powers, mandatory sentences for knife crime, reversing the hunt ban, packing the ‘22 Committee are the ones that come to mind. Some of it might be put down to the exigencies of Coalition. But others suggest a hair-trigger response to bad headlines: anything that might disrupte the Coalition or undermine puiblic support is to be avoided: go around obstacles, don’t crash against them. Where Tony Blair had no reverse gear, and Lady T was not for turning, Mr Cameron has a full gearbox and power steering that allow him to execute swerves and three point turns.

Cameron is a spineless fraud. What took you so long to work it out Benedict?

Off With Her Head

Usually I try not to trust Daily Mail stories on face value. They often get it wrong. But I’m currently not in the mood to care so if this is true and we don’t do anything then…well…we deserve what we get:

The Queen’s head could disappear from British stamps as part of controversial plans to sell off the Royal Mail, it was revealed last night.

Ministers are locked in frantic talks with Buckingham Palace to discuss how the monarch will be represented – if at all – on future stamps after the Government confessed it had failed to guarantee that the Queen’s image would survive.

Apparently the Queen is most seriously displeased:

But Royal insiders said that ‘anger’ at the Palace at the proposed sale had been heightened by the fear that it could be rushed through in advance of the 2012 Diamond Jubilee, when a range of special stamps is expected to be produced.

One said: ‘The Palace don’t like this privatisation at all but they are particularly keen to delay it until after the Jubilee if they possibly can. That could explain the delay.’

But not so displeased as to object forcefully, just delay it so that it doesn’t cause too much fuss. Our Queen is a traitor and signs away her power willingly against her coronation oath.

Fed Up

Regular readers may have noticed a downturn in the number of posts recently (and perhaps quality I don’t know). I had put it down to work commitments. In truth that’s only part of the story. Sure work commitments have increased somewhat recently, as have my personal UKIP responsibilities, but I think I’m also suffering from ‘blogging about the EU’ fatigue.

I never expected this blog to change the world, thinking that of course would be plain daft, nor did I particularly wish it to be as successful as the shamelessly self-prompting Iain Dale (now deceased – the blog that is – and of no great loss).

Blogging for me was a way of helping to instill self-discipline in my research thus improving my knowledge of the EU, by virtue of submitting it to public scrutiny. Yet therein lies a contradiction. In order to fight a battle, you need to know your enemy. But I don’t want to know my enemy. Learning more about the EU is not only deadly deadly dull but I hate it with every sinew of my being. I just want the whole thing to magically uplift and plonk itself into the Bermuda Triangle.

And it’s not just the EU. That the Tories, and especially Cameron, are europhiles is of no surprise. But only 6 and half months have gone since the election and the integration pace is unprecedented – there’s another 4 years or so at least of this. I feel I’m doomed to repeat myself ad infinitum. Despite the wonderfully versatile nature of the English language there are really only so many ways that you can call Cameron a fucking liar.

Then I see this and this:

The Government has published a new set of principles which it wants to govern the relationship between new EU laws and UK law. It wants to reduce the degree to which EU Directives are changed and tailored for the UK.

“The key to the new measures will be the principle of copying out the text of European directives directly into UK law,” said a statement from the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). “The direct ‘copy out’ principle will mean that British interpretations of European law are not unfairly restricting British companies.”

“This move will bring an end to the charge of ‘gold-plating’,” said Business Secretary Vince Cable. “The way we implement our EU obligations must foster, not hinder, UK growth by helping British businesses compete with their European neighbours.”

Basically in order to become an MP you only have to answer two questions:

  1. Do you know what an EU Directive is?
  2. Do you know what Ctrl + C and Ctrl + V means?

If yes to both you’ve got the job. This is not just taking the piss. It’s Cameron taking the piss wearing a clown suit, complete with big red feet, one of them twirly bow-tie thingies, and a water-squirting buttonhole flower whilst interfering with your wife then charging you for the privilege.

I shouldn’t even be writing this blog post tonight; I should be at a Christmas meal. That’s now been canceled because of the snow, I’m snowed in completely and the roads near me haven’t been gritted in two days so subsequently they are dangerously icy, and to top it off I couldn’t even watch live football. Not that inconvenient facts about the weather stops the Telegraph. The travel chaos made pages 1, 4 & 5 yet on page 24 we get a full page spread on how to reduce carbon emissions in transport to save the planet from global warming (can’t find online):

Transport…it’s the heart of economic activity yet the more we use it the more carbon emissions are pumped into the atmosphere. With technology and more thoughtful planning we could make fewer journeys in a greener Britain…etc etc.

Kenneth Williams, in his final words summed it up; “Oh what’s the bloody point”. However then I read this post by The Filthy Engineer which articulates wonderfully what I’m thinking and that in itself cheers me up albeit in a depressing way.

Memorable Passwords

This letter in today’s Telegraph amused me:

SIR – Learning that most passwords are easy to crack (report, December 15) made me realise that the two years of Army National Service I spent in Singapore and Malaya in the 1950s were not wasted.

My eight-digit Army number was burned on my brain and makes an ideal password which is impossible to break.

John Henesy
Maidenhead, Berkshire

Thanks John, we all now know that your password is 8 digits long and contains no letters (upper case or otherwise), that makes the task much easier (10 seconds apparently is all it takes). We also know your name, where you live, that you were in the Army, where you were and when. That can help us find out your password via other methods.

Impossible to break? I beg to differ.